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Art Spark

Ideas for professional sharing and professional development.

The presentation below was developed by Eileen Adams and Dan China to explore the use of Adobe Spark Pages as a vehicle for professional sharing.

This idea came from discussions at an ESAG meeting about the need for new ways for communities of teachers to meet and share practice. The old ways of face to face twilight meetings between teachers from different schools is no longer possible for many teachers, although NSEAD network meetings in some areas are well supported. Recent, research by NSEAD confirms that most teachers of art and design have no access to subject based support and networking.

The question was whether there could be new ways for digitally experienced teachers to engage in professional sharing. Facebook forums are sometimes helpful but by their nature tend to be superficial, eclectic, populist and lack any quality control. It was felt that Adobe Spark might provide teachers with opportunities to create and share practice and ideas which were easy to create and yet fully professional.

ART SPARK 1

Click here for Art Spark 2. This is a second demonstration Spark that was made while experimenting. Click here for some notes that we made about the use of this software.

We hope colleagues will find this interesting and that it will encourage further reflection on professional sharing in a digital,age.

Fundamental British Values in art and design education

The NSEAD has produced a paper to define the fundamental British values that are supported by art and design education. Click here for a copy.

Equality and respect for all others, not only those who have different faiths or beliefs, should be at the heart of every school, clearly reflected in day-to-day interactions and in pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development.  The Equality Act 2010 provides an excellent framework for this, structured around 9 “protected characteristics” (age; disability; gender reassignment; marriage or civil partnership; pregnancy & maternity; race; religion or belief; sex; and sexual orientation) and placing on all public bodies, including schools, the public sector equality duty.  The general duty requires schools to: eliminate discrimination, harassment and victimisation; advance equality of opportunity; and foster good relations between those who have a protected characteristic and those who do not.

Why the EBacc Lacks Substance

‘‘The English Baccalaureate (EBacc) is a school performance measure. It allows people to see how many pupils get a grade C or above in the core academic subjects* at key stage 4 in any government-funded school.’’ (DfE, 2016)

* English, mathematics, history or geography, the sciences, a language

There have been some very loud voices criticising this narrow measure and its exclusion of any arts subjects, not least the National Society for Education in Art and Design [NSEAD] – for example, see: http://www.nsead.org/downloads/Baccalaureate.pdf.

The Oxford English Dictionary defines Baccalaureate as: ‘‘an examination intended to qualify successful candidates for higher education.’’  On this basis, the EBacc is inappropriately named – as well as conceived.  GCSEs alone do not facilitate university entry, as they are a stepping stone to further study (post-16), not higher study (post-18).

The highly respected International Baccalaureate [IB] Diploma is a post-16 qualification, aimed at developing ‘‘students who have excellent breadth and depth of knowledge – students who flourish physically, intellectually, emotionally and ethically.’’ The arts have a dedicated place in the six subject groups which make up the IB Diploma curriculum.

Here is a simple ‘doughnut’ analogy to illustrate the difference between the IB Diploma and the EBacc…

The IB Diploma is like a plate of juicy, jam filled doughnuts with shiny icing and multicoloured sprinkles. There is colour, flavour and crucially choice.

stock-photo-fresh-donuts-stand-235612729

 

In stark contrast the EBACC is like a partially eaten, ‘bog standard’ doughnut: bland incomplete and unsatisfying. The only choice is ‘Hobsons’.

images

Our education system should excite young people about learning and allow them to pursue their interests. With an increasing focus on ‘pupil voice’ in many schools, in line with the aims of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, it seems very wrong that choices are being taken away from our young people.  Worryingly, the EBacc undermines the study of art for both intrinsic and extrinsic motivations, as by its current definition, it excludes art and thus implies that art is neither a core subject nor an academic one.   This is certainly not the view of the ESAG for Art, Craft and Design.

Dr Emese Hall (University of Exeter)

Researching Art, Craft and Design

There are various sources of guidance and inspiration for those looking to investigate learning and teaching in art, craft and design education.  Many of these approaches use creative and artistic methods.  Here are some suggestions to get you started…

a/r/tography Website
‘‘To be engaged in the practice of a/r/tography means to inquire in the world through an ongoing process of art making in any artform and writing not separate or illustrative of each other but interconnected and woven through each other to create additional and/or enhanced meanings…’’

Arts Based Educational Research [ABER] Bibliography
This is a very useful list of books, chapters, articles and links to conference papers about ABER on the a/r/tography website. 

British Educational Research Association ABER Special Interest Group [SIG]
Arts Based Education Research aims to understand education through arts-based concepts, techniques and practice. Practitioners use a variety of arts-based methodologies to undertake their research and / or to communicate their understanding through such diverse genres as autobiography, narrative, poetry, visual arts, drama, dance, music and performance…’’

ABER SIG of the American Educational Research Association [AERA] – Resources Page
Providing a community for those who view education through artistic lenses, who use a variety of arts-based methodologies, and who communicate understandings through diverse genres.’’

National (US) Art Education Association [NAEA] Research Portal
‘‘What does current research say about the value of learning in the visual arts? What topics are emerging in the arts research world? How does research inform teaching practices and how can what happens in your classroom inform research?’’

NAEA Research Agenda
‘‘The NAEA Research Agenda is designed to encourage and disseminate research communicating the value of visual arts education and its collective impact on students, schools, communities, and society.’’

International Society of Education through Art [InSEA] Research Blog
Look here for links to recent international PhD theses, art/s conferences, news etc.

Dr Emese Hall (University of Exeter)

Creative Journeys

This is an excellent resource for teachers and students considering art as a subject and a career. It provides information and examples of outstanding people who made this journey. This is really worth clicking.

Creative Journeys website

#CreativeJourneys is a Sorrell Foundation project supported by HEAD Trust (the Higher Education in Art and Design Foundation) and Arts Council England.

NSEAD Research Report 2015-2016

The National Society for Education in Art and Design (NSEAD) has recently published the latest (2015-2016) research report into the impact of government policies on our subject over the last five years. This is an important report and should be read by everyone interested in art and design education. Below is a copy of the introduction to the report by Ged Gast, President of NSEAD and a member of the ESAG for Art and Design.

click here for a copy of the report

President’s foreword

Many parents believe that the curriculum is an entitlement and that their children should have a choice to study subjects to examination level where they show exceptional abilities and commitment. Until recently such an entitlement has meant that children and young people could pursue their interests in education, leading to careers in the creative, media and design industries.

These same industries are the envy of the world and continue to be one of the most successful sectors in the UK, outperforming most others. This is why this survey report comes at such a crucial time for art, craft and design education. It is a health check for our subject, with findings that indicate a context of increasing misunderstanding and less regard for art, craft and design education, the arts and technology. Without this survey, there would be little evidence of the impact of government policy and the restructured curriculum, which seeks to address the very real problem of standards in English and mathematics and the qualification profile at 16 plus. However important it is to address such problems, it is never appropriate to do so by limiting curriculum breadth or subjects which contribute towards the personal growth and aspirations of children and young people, as well as their future career choices.

This survey provides evidence of the growing impact of these changes, foisted on schools through a culture of subject devaluation by policies which imply that even successful study and high standards of achievement in the arts will limit career and university choices. For those who would benefit from the transferable skills accessed through the arts, or for those who aspire to a successful, rewarding and world-class career in one of our creative and media industries, this report identifies how policy decisions are beginning to disadvantage some children and young people.

Furthermore, the impact of policies on the dedicated teachers who deliver our subject is also carefully evidenced in this report. In the wake of the Department for Education’s Government Response to the Workload Challenge, 2015, the NSEAD’s key survey findings show that the wellbeing and workload of art and design teachers should be urgently considered and addressed.

There are important messages here for parents and carers, teachers, senior leaders and school governors, as well as Ofsted inspectors, politicians and leaders of industry. I urge you to read this survey and recognise the descriptions of circumstances and damage that has already been done within our schools, and to the aspirations of children and young people who want to develop their creative skills to enrich our culture, contributing to future prosperity and industry.

Ged Gast

President NSEAD

NSEAD 2015 Survey – art and design in schools

The NSEAD (National Society for Education on Art and Design – the subject association for art http://www.nsead.com) does an annual survey to investigate trends in art and design in schools. Last year the survey documented the emerging (negative) impact of eBac on art uptake and provision. You will understand, even better than me, how the continuing programme being pursued by the government is likely to have an increasing impact on our subject. There is no one else collecting subject specific data. HMI no longer undertakes subject reviews. NSEAD is probably the only national voice for art and design education in schools and it does have access to the national debate. It is really important that their research and data is seen as robust and therefore, their sample size needs to be as large as we can make it.

Here is the link to the 2014 survey results. This has informed the work of the ESAG and debate in parliament and elsewhere http://www.nsead.org/Downloads/NSEAD_ART_CRAFT_AND_DESIGN_EDUCATOR_SURVEY_REPORT_2014.pdf

The 2015 survey can be accessed at the URL below. It is important to encourage as many art teachers as possible to complete the survey and provide an accurate picture of our subject.

https://plymouthbusiness.eu.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_bOzRlQyTHXRGipv&Q_JFE=0

We hope you will be able to complete the survey and share this with many of your colleagues.

Good practice in art, craft and design

In January OFSTED published a set of papers sharing examples of good practice in art teaching. There are 12 case studies in all and they include building professional practice into GCE ‘A’ level courses, developing drawing, inspiring creativity and developing a whole school approach to art, craft and design. The case studies are  from both primary and secondary schools. Click here for the link.

Generation ART: Childrens Art Exhibition

Generation ART: Young Artists on Tour is an exhibition of children and young people’s artwork with associated learning programmes, supported by Arts Council England’s Strategic touring programme. Run by engage, the National Association for Gallery Education, the exhibition will open at Turner Contemporary, Margate in June, and tour to New Walk Museum and Art Gallery and Soft Touch Arts in Leicester, and Quay Arts on the Isle of Wight in 2015-16.

Goals of Generation ART: Young Artists on Tour
The aim of Generation ART is for children and young people to be involved in a high quality exhibition at every stage, as curators, artists, audiences and champions. By profiling high quality artwork by children and young people, Generation ART strives to raise the aspirations of schools, teachers and of children and young people, and inspire them to create excellent artwork. click here to go to the website