Next Gen Skills

If we thought that the new subject of ‘computing’ is nothing to do with us we would be wrong. Next Gen Skills is a campaign supported by UKIE which seeks to promote an educational alliance of arts and science subjects to feed the growing and significant sector of hi-tech industries.

Here is what the campaign stands for:

‘Next Gen Skills is campaigning for:

  • The introduction of an industry relevant Computer Science course within the framework of the National Curriculum
  • A review of ICT in its current form and to embed essential ICT skills across the wider curriculum
  • The promotion of the vital role that teaching maths, physics, art and computer science will play in ensuring the growth of UK’s digital, creative and hi-tech industries

UKIE

The Next Gen Skills campaign is backed by the Association for United Kingdom Interactive Entertainment or UKIE – a trade body that represents the whole of the UK’s video games and wider interactive entertainment industry. Founded in 1989 (and formerly known as ELSPA), UKIE’s membership includes games publishers, developers and the academic institutions that support the industry
UKIE works with government to champion a range of issues including age ratings, education and skills, tax incentives and protecting intellectual property rights. It also works with the media to ensure true and accurate representation of the sector by raising awareness of the industry’s positive economic contribution and the societal benefits of gaming to policy makers, regulators and consumers.
One of UKIE’s key roles is to support its members by providing them with key market information, promoting careers and offering the business support services, training and best-practice knowledge to enable them to operate most effectively.
Next Gen Skills is also working with partners to make these changes a reality on the ground by supporting schools across the country to make ‘digital making’ and creative programming truly mainstream and, most importantly, fun!
The campaign believes that for Computing and Computer Science subjects to be taught creatively, i.e. with reference to Art, Design and the humanities – they need to be based on ‘STEAM’ not just ‘STEM’ – endorsing the approach suggested by NESTA in its Manifesto for the Creative Economy.’

Click here for the link to Ian Livingstone’s TED talk about the power of play.

Dan China

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